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By AMUSEMENT

 

mirage5

NAME: Mirage

AUTHOR: Ralf Baecker, a Berlin-based artist with a special interest for technology.

DESCRIPTION: First, take the time to watch the video and to appreciate the beauty of the landscapes created by the laser projections. Now, bear with me for a second to understand the technical explanation behind it, which is not exactly for the faint-hearted. “The installation “Mirage” uses principles from optics (astronomy/telescopes) and artificial neural network research to form a projection apparatus. Mirage generates a synthesised landscape based on its perception through a fluxgate magnetometer (Förster Sonde). A fluxgate magnetometer registers the magnetic field of the earth which is dependent on the sun’s activity and feeds it into a unsupervised learning algorithm for analyzation. At the same time the algorithm, that is based on the principle of a helmholz machine, “hallucinates” variations of the previously analyzed signal.
This variations are translated into a two dimensional matrix that physically transforms a thin mirror sheet by 48 muscle wire actors. The surface of the mirror sheet changes analog to the systems state. A thin laser line is directed on the mirror surface in a acute angle to generate a depth landscape like projection on the wall. Through the constant shifting signals the projection resembles a subliminal wandering through a landscape.”

AMUSEMENT RATE: The amount of technologies at work might be heavy but the ultimate goal of the artwork is surprisingly light and poetic.  Invented by Google researcher Geoff Hinton, the Helmholtz machine uses the principle of wake-sleep algorithm to consolidate its neural network. Ralf Baecker imagines that during the “sleep” phase, Google data centers cut off their perceptions and start dreaming. Could these red depth landscapes be the dreams of these machines? Mirage is currently on show until April 26 at the Obsessive Sensing exhibition at LEAP (Lab for Emerging Arts and Performance) in Berlin.

Source: Creative Applications

essai2

mirage4 mirage3 mirage2 mirage1

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

By AMUSEMENT

 

mirage5

NAME: Mirage

AUTHOR: Ralf Baecker, a Berlin-based artist with a special interest for technology.

DESCRIPTION: First, take the time to watch the video and to appreciate the beauty of the landscapes created by the laser projections. Now, bear with me for a second to understand the technical explanation behind it, which is not exactly for the faint-hearted. “The installation “Mirage” uses principles from optics (astronomy/telescopes) and artificial neural network research to form a projection apparatus. Mirage generates a synthesised landscape based on its perception through a fluxgate magnetometer (Förster Sonde). A fluxgate magnetometer registers the magnetic field of the earth which is dependent on the sun’s activity and feeds it into a unsupervised learning algorithm for analyzation. At the same time the algorithm, that is based on the principle of a helmholz machine, “hallucinates” variations of the previously analyzed signal.
This variations are translated into a two dimensional matrix that physically transforms a thin mirror sheet by 48 muscle wire actors. The surface of the mirror sheet changes analog to the systems state. A thin laser line is directed on the mirror surface in a acute angle to generate a depth landscape like projection on the wall. Through the constant shifting signals the projection resembles a subliminal wandering through a landscape.”

AMUSEMENT RATE: The amount of technologies at work might be heavy but the ultimate goal of the artwork is surprisingly light and poetic.  Invented by Google researcher Geoff Hinton, the Helmholtz machine uses the principle of wake-sleep algorithm to consolidate its neural network. Ralf Baecker imagines that during the “sleep” phase, Google data centers cut off their perceptions and start dreaming. Could these red depth landscapes be the dreams of these machines? Mirage is currently on show until April 26 at the Obsessive Sensing exhibition at LEAP (Lab for Emerging Arts and Performance) in Berlin.

Source: Creative Applications

essai2

mirage4 mirage3 mirage2 mirage1

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