Tags: , , , , , ,

By AMUSEMENT

 

NAME: 3D-Printed Record

AUTHOR:
Amanda Ghassaei, an assistant tech editor at Instructables.

DESCRIPTION: A custom made program created by Amanda converts digital audio files into 3D models of records. The 3D printed “vinyls” can be played on any record player. The audio quality is of course far from a MP3. The record only has a sampling rate of 11kHz (44.1 kHz for a MP3) and a resolution of 5-6bit (compared to typical 16 bit audio). However, despite the low quality, the music is easily recognizable. You can find the 3D models downloads and more details about the project on Instructables.

AMUSEMENT RATE: You will not be printing your own records at home anytime soon. The quality is not there yet and it remains very expensive: each record uses $200 to $300 worth of resin. That would make one expensive record! The process invented by Amanda Ghassaei is still very ingenious. It is only in its early stage, she wants to perfect it to improve the quality of the audio. Don’t throw your dusty record player just yet. 3D printing is bringing old school audio formats back in trend. The 3D-printed Fisher Price discs last September and now these records : the future might be more retro than we think.

Source: Co. Design


Tags: , , , , , ,

By AMUSEMENT

 

NAME: 3D-Printed Record

AUTHOR:
Amanda Ghassaei, an assistant tech editor at Instructables.

DESCRIPTION: A custom made program created by Amanda converts digital audio files into 3D models of records. The 3D printed “vinyls” can be played on any record player. The audio quality is of course far from a MP3. The record only has a sampling rate of 11kHz (44.1 kHz for a MP3) and a resolution of 5-6bit (compared to typical 16 bit audio). However, despite the low quality, the music is easily recognizable. You can find the 3D models downloads and more details about the project on Instructables.

AMUSEMENT RATE: You will not be printing your own records at home anytime soon. The quality is not there yet and it remains very expensive: each record uses $200 to $300 worth of resin. That would make one expensive record! The process invented by Amanda Ghassaei is still very ingenious. It is only in its early stage, she wants to perfect it to improve the quality of the audio. Don’t throw your dusty record player just yet. 3D printing is bringing old school audio formats back in trend. The 3D-printed Fisher Price discs last September and now these records : the future might be more retro than we think.

Source: Co. Design


Comments

  • No comments yet - be the first.

Leave a comment

googlefeat -

Now /

Gigantic net suspended in the air becomes a crowd-controlled sculpture powered by Google Chrome

By AMUSEMENT

[DIGITALLY-INSPIRED] Spanning 745 feet between buildings of downtown Vancouver, this monumental interactive sculpture was built for TED's 30th anniversary. At night, the net made of a fiber 15 times stronger than steel comes to live as projectors illuminate the structure. Visitors are then able to interact with the sculpture to transform it into a massive crowd-controlled artwork.